peuterey paradigma Preamble of the Free African Society

giubbino uomo peuterey Preamble of the Free African Society

The “Preamble” and “Articles” of the Free African Society (FAS) provide a succinct portrait of the organization, the first of its kind in Philadelphia, and probably the first in America.Established by Absalom Jones, Richard Allen, and other free blacks in 1787, the Society’s purpose was “to support one another in sickness, and for the benefit of their widows and fatherless children.”The Preamble,
peuterey paradigma Preamble of the Free African Society
dated April 12, 1787, explains that the original intent of Allen and Jones was “to form some kind of religious society” for “the people of their complexion whom they beheld with sorrow, because of their irreligious and uncivilized state.” However, the small size of the group, and the fact that they “differed in their religious sentiments,” led to the formation of a religiously oriented mutual aid society instead. Though not mentioned in the document,
peuterey paradigma Preamble of the Free African Society
opposition from blacks and whites to the formation of a separate church was also a decisive factor.